Friday, February 18, 2011

Who was Architect Charles M. Goodman?

Charles M. Goodman (1906-1992)
Photo Credit: PreservationNation.org
From the Charles M. Goodman Archive Webpage at the Library of Congress Bicentennial Website

"Architectural historian Richard Guy Wilson has written that architect Charles M. Goodman was 'A figure of international stature' whose 'impact can scarcely be measured' and whose designs 'formed the basis of the generic Modern American house and school, widely imitated in every part of the country.' Moreover, Goodman believed that 'modern technology and materials gave the architect a new responsibility. For him, good design could influence how people live and how they relate to Nature . . . The result was a body of architecture of great distinction that captured Americans’ imagination for many years...'

"Prior to World War II, Goodman was a leading designer of government buildings, including the Federal Building at the New York World’s Fair, Federal Post Office buildings in many locations, and the Terminal Building at Washington’s National Airport. In the post-war period he emerged as one of the most successful, respected, influential, and widely published Modernist designers in the nation.

"He did much to define the form of the American house in the 1950s and 1960s, especially through his Alcoa Research Houses and work done for Life Magazine and National Homes, which erected more than 100,000 houses according to his designs. He was at the forefront of experimentation in new building technologies and materials, including pre-fabricated and precast construction and the use of aluminum."

2 comments:

  1. From Rochester Alcoa Steve.....Here is a link to a picture of Charles Goodman in his office - from Dwell Magazine, Oct/Nov 2005. If you look at the right hand side of the pic you will see a prototype of a grill from an Alcoa House.
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/e5095/1470021227/in/faves-22021175@N02/

    ReplyDelete